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Dyslexia Myths: What are the Most Common Reading Disability Misconceptions?

Hear from seasoned Speech Pathologists as they expand more on their experiences with these misconceptions.

Watch and learn the rest of the dyslexia misconceptions.

Have You Heard These Common Dyslexia Myths?

Have You Heard These Common Dyslexia Myths?

Myth #1. Dyslexia is seeing letters backwards.

Truth:  There is no scientific evidence that those with dyslexia see letters backwards. In fact, dyslexia is caused by an underlying phonological awareness weakness which causes difficulty with the perception of sounds in spoken words. Individuals can see the letters, but are unable to put the sounds in the correct order to formulate a word when reading and spelling.

Myth #2. Dyslexia is more common in boys than girls.

Truth:  While it is true that more boys are identified as having dyslexia, there are just as many girls who struggle with reading.  It seems that boys are noticed more frequently due to the behaviors that accompany their learning disabilities, whereas more girls react in less obvious ways with their struggles.

Myth #3. Kids can outgrow Dyslexia.

Truth:  Since dyslexia is a disability affecting the brain’s ability to perceive sounds, specific therapy is needed to change the brain’s functioning.  At the Reading Therapy Center, Inc., we have clients ranging in age from 6-60 who all exhibit a disability in reading and spelling skills.  Age does not matter.

Myth #4. If you read to your child, your child won’t have Dyslexia.

Truth:  While reading to a  child is recommended and helpful, it does not teach a child to read or overcome a reading disability.  Only specific, intensive therapy can help overcome this disability.

Myth #5. It is the Teachers’ or Parents’ fault if your child struggles with a reading disability.

Truth:  It is a teacher’s and parent’s responsibility to advocate for a child to receive the specialized services they need when a disability is present.  Classroom teachers can work hard to support services provided outside of the classroom, but they cannot remediate a reading disability to the extent that is needed for many children.

Myth #6. Learning disabilities are the same as attention and behavior disorders.

Truth:  While attention and behavior issues are often present in children with learning disabilities, it is not the cause of learning disabilities.  Some children have attention and/or  behavior issues which make it more difficult for them to attend to the learning tasks required in the classroom;  however, when these issues are dealt with properly, the child is able to learn and perform at grade level.

A child may have a comprehension disability which may look like an attention issue.  It may appear like the child is struggling to attend in class but in reality they can’t understand the material being presented and become inattentive.

Still other children struggle with both learning and attention which can be complex.  Through proper testing and diagnosis, this can be determined and a proper treatment plan can be developed.

Watch Julia’s RTC Success Story!

Watch Julia’s RTC Success Story!

Watch Layla’s RTC Success Story!

Watch Layla’s RTC Success Story!

1 out of 5 children have dyslexia.

Dyslexia is the most common learning disability.

Are you noticing your child or student has little interest in reading, complains about how hard it is, or totally avoids it at all costs?

Take our quiz to see if your child or student exhibits any of the warning signs of a reading difficulty.

1 out of 5 children have dyslexia.

Dyslexia is the most common learning disability.

Are you noticing your child or student has little interest in reading, complains about how hard it is, or totally avoids it at all costs?

Take our quiz to see if your child or student exhibits any of the warning signs of a reading difficulty.